Boston Women​Preneurs Blog

Sales Coaching: Example of How to Leave a Voicemail that Will Get Noticed

Posted by Feb 24, 2013 10:32:00 AM Alison Powell


Each day as an inside sales rep you have certain "things" that you could do to optimize your chance of someone answering, someone calling you back or someone emailing you back that somehow found interest in what you said. I really do think of prospecting as a game. BUT- there are ways for you to optmize your chance of the calls that you make or outbound attempts actually getting you somewhere. From my experience if you have a day of prospecting where you have nothing else that you are doing. Meaning you don't have qualifying calls, you don't have scheduled exploratory calls and you don't have demos of your product scheduled- you are just prospecting. My go to is that you should make about 70 outreaches via phone and leave vmails for all that don't pick up as well as send an email pertaining to why you called in the first place. 

I think this process works well and I will explain how you should leave your vmail. But the most important part of prospecting is not when you pick up the phone and dial, it is about what you do when you source the lead or get the inbound lead. So either way- if you receive inbound leads or source your own, you are not done. This is not when you should just pick up the phone and dial. You need to do your research. 

What I mean by research is that you need to go hunting for relevant information that will help you explain why the heck you are calling this person in the first place. Let's start with an example if you source your own leads.

Example: Sourcing your own leads.

  • First step should be that you are sourcing leads where you know that they are actually worth your time. You should truly understand what a good fit for your business is. Why would someone want to buy or use your product or service. You need to fully understand your value prop and start to figure out innovative ways to find those types of companies that would naturally be a good fit for your service/product. 
  • At HubSpot, we help companies develop inbound marketing strategies for lead generation through the use of our marketing software and our inbound marketing methodology. A good fit for our software and our process of marketing is a company that has a concept of a lead, that maybe has multiple products or services they offer, offers those products and services to multiple markets or industries, has a website that looks like they paid money on it, has no marketing software running on their website currently, has a Marketing Director and/or marketing team... Those are all things that I would look for initially to make sure that I am sourcing leads that probably would have some type of need for inbound marketing or experimenting with lead gen. From there you should dig further, do your homework. Try to find press releases about them that are current. Look through their news section to read about what is going on with their company. Do they have growth goals that align with what your company solves for? 
  • What I do next is write down anything and everything that you know about the structure of their team in the notes of that lead. I also write down all the pertinent information from whatever I found out about the company. Maybe ideas on what I think we could help them with based on things I read about on their site or in doing my research. It also helps to check our LinkedIn and see the background of who you are calling. The more you know about that person you are calling and the company, the better chance you have at actually explaining why you are reaching out. 
  • Every lead you enter manually and source yourself should be potentially good. There is no point in sourcing someone just for the heck of it. If you don't think there is a fit from your research don't take the time to put it into CRM because you won't want to call it when you come across it again. Every lead you put in should have some potential and you should know why. Imagine if every lead you came across in your leads queue daily were good...
Now you can start to prospect. 
 
Next comes the actual process for leaving a vmail and email. I know that some sales coaches and some sales coaching says to leave a vmail after you call and don't connect say for three times. I don't think you should wait. I have seen that if you leave a vmail when you call the first time and they don't pick up, then you send a customized email right after that vmail you are more likely to get a call back or probably an email. 
 
 
Typically if I spend one day making around 70 call attempts I can connect with about 10-20ish people depending on the day. Out of those it would be good to book 1 appointment. If you leave vmail/email for the other attempts, you should get back some type of response either later on that day/night or sometime that week. 
 
 
I think the best results come from doing this prospecting process on Mondays. That way they have all week to get back to you if they did see initial interest and you have the whole week to call them again and try to catch them. Then you can reference your email and your vmail too. 
 
 
I will leave you with a little bit of sales coaching on how to leave your voicemail after you have done good research on your leads. 
 
 
Sales Coaching for leaving a good voicemail:
"Hi Suzie. This is Ali from HubSpot. We haven't spoken before but I came across your company today while reading some press releases. I read that about a month ago you hired a new Sales Director to lead your inside sales team. After doing some more research on how you market and your lead gen efforts, it looked like online marketing was something that you were focused on. HubSpot is a marketing software company, where I typically work with B2B companies usually in the software or technology space in targetting niche industries that are looking to expand their lead gen and have high growth goals. I will send you an email to see if this is interesting at all. If you do want to give me a ring back my phone number is... Thanks again and hope to chat with you soon."
 

That would be a typical first vmail for me. I then would send out an email that explains more in depth in why I am reaching out and what made me think that marketing software would actually help them. I am not that salesy in general so you will see that my style is not always what typical sales coaching says to do. Honestly, I don't think leaving short vmails helps. Some people say leave a short and to the point vmail. Well, I don't think that gets you anywhere because you don't have time to say anything that would excite them to call you back. SAY A LOT but only things that are important. 
 
 
One of the most important things I have learned in sales is that you need to be yourself. Don't try to do things that you don't feel comfortable doing. If you are confident in the research that you did on the company and why you are reaching out, it should come across on the other line or in your outbound email. If they see your compassion and they see the potential they will write back or pick up the phone next time you call. 

Topics: sales coaching, leaving a voicemail, sales prospecting

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